Quick Answer: Is 2 Feet Deep Enough For Fence Posts?

Will wooden posts rot in concrete?

Simply setting the posts in concrete does create a condition that will accelerate rot in the bottom of the posts.

With pressure-treated posts, the rot will be slow.

First, the posts should be set on top of a bed of coarse gravel 3 to 6 inches deep, so the base of the post is in contact with the gravel..

How many bags of quikrete do I need for a fence post?

Remember, the depth of the post hole should be one-half of the above-ground post height. (Example: For a 6 feet above ground post, use a post with an overall height of 9 feet and place 3 feet in the ground). The calculator will indicate the number of 50 lb. bags of QUIKRETE® Fast-Setting Concrete you need.

Should I use 4×4 or 6×6 fence posts?

6×6 is overkill for sturdiness. 4×4 is the standard. And if you do it as a privacy fence, 6×6 posts stand out and make it look more substantial.

How many feet should be between fence posts?

Most fence posts can be spaced 8 to 12 feet apart. While this is a general criteria, it doesn’t cover all scenarios. For instance, high tensile fence can have larger spacing, requiring line posts every 15 to 20 feet for field fence styles, and as much as 20-30 feet for high tensile barbed and smooth wire.

Is 1 ft deep enough for fence post?

You should always bury one-third of your fence post underground. … This means that unless you are building a 2-foot fence, which is unlikely in any garden, a 1-foot hole will not be deep enough to support your post. For main and gateposts, you should dig the holes an additional 6 inches deep.

Can fence posts be 10 feet apart?

Typical spacing is right around 8 feet between each post however different circumstances may call for different measurements and it is not uncommon to have spacing between posts reach up to 10 feet. Once you have a rough idea of your post layout start by digging your first hole.

How many bags of concrete do I need for a 4×4 fence post?

Mix two 50lb bags of concrete with water in a mixing tub or 5-gallon bucket. Add concrete into the hole and around the 4” x 4”. Depending on your climate, let concrete set up for 24 – 48 hours.

How do you keep fence posts from rotting in concrete?

wrap your posts in blueskin from the concrete down. concrete is porous, and the posts will always be wet. keep the top of the concrete a few inches above grade, sloped away. seal the concrete-timber joint with thermoplast.

How deep should posts be for a 6 foot fence?

2 feetThe depth of the hole should be 1/3-1/2 the post height above ground (i.e., a 6-foot tall fence would require a hole depth of at least 2 feet).

How deep should a 10 foot fence post be?

The general rule of thumb when setting a post is that the depth of the post’s hole needs to be one-third to one-half of the actual above-ground height of the post.

How deep should a 8 foot fence post be?

about 2 feetMany builders use 8-foot posts and bury them about 2 feet deep in concrete, leaving a small margin for trimming the tops of the posts to the finished height after the posts and/or the fence panels are installed. Using 10-foot posts allows for deeper burial and leaves more wiggle room for trimming the tops.

How do you replace fence panels in concrete posts?

Lay your fence panel on the ground with its “front” facing up.Step 1: Reinforce Your Fence Panel. … Step 2: Make Legs. … Step 3: Clamp the Legs. … Step 4: Roll it Over. … Step 5: Lift the Structure to Sit Vertically. … Step 6: Remove Clamps and Lengths of Wood.

How deep do concrete fence posts need to be?

600mmConcrete fence posts must be fixed into the ground in the traditional way: by digging a hole. When concreting fence posts into the ground, the posts should be buried a minimum of 600mm deep. The recommended depth for a 1.80m or 6 foot high fence is 760mm or 2′ 6″.

Should I use concrete for fence posts?

Concrete is the most secure material for setting fence posts, especially if you have sandy soil. Gravel may be okay with dense, clay-heavy soil, but in looser soil, concrete is the only thing that will truly keep your fence posts stuck in place.